How You See

I find myself often very confused by people who feel motivated to criticize others. Its not just because I tend to see things more positively, because I am probably more of a realist that an optimist. I think critical people seem to feel a sense of duty and credibility when they project their judgements upon others.

Our society has encouraged this behaviour in that our news reports and highly charged analysis groups spew enormous amounts of negativity across our media outlets. If we are unable to point out the imperfections in Gov. Sarah Palin or President Barak Obama we are considered ignorant or labeled an extreme… something or other. Our Western Culture has come to believe that if we cannot find something wrong with someone, we are abnormal. Are any of us really that good that we have to seek very far to find imperfections.

Paul told us that, “all have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God” (Rom 3:23).

It would seem to me that we would become more surprised when a person got “it” right rather than flaunting a mistake or flaw in somebody.

My father used to say “it takes no intelligence what so ever to criticize… its easy to point out the obvious, but can you give me some solutions that show your creative smarts”.

My father was a realist as well I guess, because he believed it was a waste of time to find the flaws in others. He often would explain the difference between problems and opportunities… simply how we see them!

I think that is why I get so tired of critical people, because I was raised to see different. Being a critic is all about how you see! Contemplate this thought for a moment… spending our time seeing the mistakes of others actually causes us to miss our opportunity to witness thousands of moments of greatness that came from good intentions mingled with the grace of Heaven.

The Bible tells us to rejoice when we face various trials of our faith (Jam 1:2-3), because something great is produced in us – “patience”… which is really just a way of seeing. Patience is a way of seeing that waits for something expected to reveal itself. It seems to me that we become more credible when we are patient with others, than when we are critics.

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