Posts Tagged ‘reference’

Becoming Flesh

“The Word became flesh and made His dwelling among us. We have seen His glory, the glory of the One and Only, who came from the Father, full of grace and truth.” (Jn 1:14)

This verse is arguably the most profound and exciting statement in the Bible. We know Jesus came to seek and save the lost, but the good news goes much farther than that. Salvation is not merely the removal of our sins, it is access to life as a new creation. Jesus became flesh and dwelt among us to offer a radical transformation of what it means to be human.

Christmas is not only about Jesus; it’s about you and me!

True Humanity:

When John wrote that Jesus became flesh and dwelt among us, he used an ancient image the Jews were familiar with. The word he used that is translated “dwelt” literally means “to pitch one’s tent”. It was a reference to God’s dwelling among the Israelites in the tabernacle, a special tent that was the precursor to the temple of Solomon (Exod. 40:34-38). The difference is that the Word, “Jesus” didn’t just dwell among humanity, He became human. He actually put on flesh and became like us… in our frailty and our vulnerability.

As the perfect human, Jesus comes to define everything it means to be human. Whatever Jesus is, that is what He has made humanity to be in Him. To be fully human is to know God (Jn. 17:3)! To be fully human is to live in the knowledge that He loves us, wants us, and will never let us go. Jesus heals and restores our full humanity, becoming for us the Glorious Revelation of how God feels about humanity.

“For God so loved…” (Jn. 3:16).

Jesus shows us what life is all about. It’s about walking in communion with God, being in relationship with the One who created us, loves us, dwells among us, and adopts us as His own precious children. In becoming flesh, Jesus showed us the Father’s love and compassion toward us. He “pitched His tent” among us, because He wants to be with us… to identify with us. God didn’t turn His back on sinners, He came to live among them, to love them and to heal them.

Truly Human

“The Word became flesh and made His dwelling among us. We have seen His glory, the glory of the One and Only, who came from the Father, full of grace and truth.” (Jn 1:14)

This verse is arguably the most profound and exciting statement in the Bible. We know Jesus came to seek and save the lost, but the good news goes much farther than that. Salvation is not merely the removal of our sins, it is access to life as a new creation. Jesus became flesh and dwelt among us to offer a radical transformation of what it means to be human.

The Christian holiday of Christmas is not only about Jesus; it’s about you and me!

True Humanity:

When John wrote that Jesus became flesh and dwelt among us, he used an ancient image the Jews were familiar with. The word he used that is translated “dwelt” literally means “to pitch one’s tent”. It was a reference to God’s dwelling among the Israelites in the tabernacle, a special tent that was the precursor to the temple of Solomon (Exod. 40:34-38). The difference is that the Word, “Jesus” didn’t just dwell among humanity, He became human. He actually put on flesh and became like us… in our frailty and our vulnerability.

As the perfect human, Jesus comes to define everything it means to be human. Whatever Jesus is, that is what He has made humanity to be in Him. To be fully human is to know God (Jn. 17:3)! To be fully human is to live in the knowledge that He loves us, wants us, and will never let us go. Jesus heals and restores our full humanity, becoming for us the Glorious Revelation of how God feels about humanity.

“For God so loved…” (Jn. 3:16).

Jesus shows us what life is all about. It’s about walking in communion with God, being in relationship with the One who created us, loves us, dwells among us, and adopts us as His own precious children. In becoming flesh, Jesus showed us the Father’s love and compassion toward us. He “pitched His tent” among us, because He wants to be with us… to identify with us. God didn’t turn His back on sinners, He came to live among them, to love them and to heal them.

An Apostolic Call

Called an "Apostle"

Called an "Apostle"

Nearly 2,000 years from the time of Jesus and the call still reverberates in the ears of those who are mending nets or working in the fields. The call is for disciples, those who will follow Christ without hesitation. Jesus is calling for the ones who are ready to pick up their cross… and run to the Nations.

Jesus is Walking the Shorelines:

Throughout the Earth today, people like the first century Peter and Andrew or Paul and Silas are sensing a deployment of epic proportion. Christ is calling them forth. Its as real a sound as at any time in human history. Its like Jesus is walking the shorelines of our comfortable lives, challenging people to respond and step away from the activities of fixing nets and building programs. The Church of Jesus Christ is being called to fill the Kingdom… with souls.  

Note: Its an Apostolic Calling;

You might ask, “So what makes a calling apostolic?” Glad you asked. At the center are two key concepts – “send” and “go”. The word “apostle” was a common military term used among the naval officers of Rome during the time of Christ. The word described a person like an admiral of a fleet of ships being sent with the special assignment of colonizing a new territory. These individuals were ambassadors who represented the interest of Rome. The “apostle” part of their calling has to do with their message, what they carried. In those days Rome wanted to conquer the world and when the apostle went into new territory it was to inform the present occupants of that land that they were under a new governing order. A flag and constitution were the first two orders of business.

Interestingly the Bible uses the term in reference to the returning twelve disciples Jesus had sent out with power and authority. They are sent out as students and learners- “disciples” (Lk 9:1), but return testifying to all that they had done, now being called- “apostles” (Lk 9:10). It would seem to suggest that their experience had transformed their understanding of themselves, to such a degree that they were now ruled by the purposes and priorities of the Kingdom they were representing. Thus an Apostolic Call is embraced by those who are fully engaged in establishing God’s Kingdom on planet Earth. 

New Testament Paradigm:

When the 120 believers in the upper room experienced the outpouring of the Holy Spirit, there was such a massive wave of God’s power that hit the Earth that the little company of followers were transformed into revolutionaries. The region was infiltrated, shaken and completely turned upside down by the Holy Spirit. This event represents the first apostolic revolution and at the end of the day 3,000 souls were saved and a New Church was birthed that looked nothing like the religion of the day. A unity of Spirit and community of faith were now to begin shaping the future of how the World would see God (Acts 2:40-47). The Church would be supernatural and authentic, yet committed to one another and the teaching of the Apostles.

An Apostolic People: 

An Apostolic People are a sending people, knit from the same fabric as their Leader, Jesus. “As the Father has sent (apostello) Me into the world, I also have sent (apostello) them into the world” (Jn 17:18). Today, as in the days following Pentecost, there is an outpouring of the Holy Spirit that is making its way across our land and reviving the apostolic mandate. The echo is felt in the heart of every Apostle,  “go into all the world and make disciples of all the nations” (Mt 28:19).

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